Green: 2012 And What A Moderate Or Conservative In The White House Means

Let's suppose President Obama does not get elected to a second term.  Ever wonder what will happen to all the green policies he's instituted?  I think most of that will be gone.  There are some efforts that will continue.  For instance, GM's march towards hybrids and EV will likely continue but most government supported projects will close or be allowed to progress to an inevitable end.

Now, torn between ideals is one in which there is a vocal calling for smaller government and to reduce spending and the deficit.  On the other hand, green policies, pushing the envelope for new renewable tech and conservation initiatives, could mean economic prosperity, a reliable energy source, and fundamental shift in our national security as well as those of the West.

And yet, I don't see the argument being formed in such the way I described or a policy which balances both immediate concerns as well as a vision for the future.  

The heavy Democratic losses in 2010 showed that the country is fed up with the polarization of political landscape and the GOP leadership doesn't recognize that, probably because of all the noises created by its more libertarian freshman representatives and the Tea Party wing.  

Meanwhile, the Democrats have never been very good at articulating their positions.  The lecturing we get from the White House from time to time certainly isn't what we need.  

As always, I'm hopeful.  So far the change we thought we were getting has not worked out just the way President Obama promised.  Granted he's got a mess when he entered the White House.  But we need him to tell us where things are and where we are headed.  We certainly are not going to get a clear vision from Harry Reid, Nancy Polesi, or John Boehner.  

President Obama remains quite popular among the electorate and there is no indication that he'll be the second coming of Jimmy Carter.  It would take a very moderate GOP candidate to defeat him.  A John Huntsman, former governor of Utah and ambassador to China.  And should such a moderate President be in the White House, what will happen to all our green gains over the last few years?

Just this weekend, the Senate passed legislation to end ethanol subsidy.  It was known as the "ethanol pledge" from The Wing West.  To me that was surprising to say the least.  Perhaps, a GOP House with a moderate GOP President could even work together to find a way to end the billions in loop holes and special tax treatments for big oil  And perhaps some of that money could go towards reducing the deficit as well as fund future green growth.  

Meanwhile, such a new President isn't likely to push as hard as President Obama with a green revolution.  Hey, it's going kind of slow already.


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