Wanna Live In Panasonic's Smart City? It'll Be Ready by 2014

For about one thousand families, Panasonic will build a model smart city in Japan designed to be green and efficient by 2014.  That's about 3-4 years from now.  I mention that because this is not decades away but 36 to 48 months away.  

So what exactly will be in "P-Town"?  

  • Solar Panels to provide electricity.
  • EV will be the main if not only mode of transportion.
  • Potential P-Town residence can begin applying for residency by March 2014 and the whole town is expected to be filled by 2018.
The goal is to showcase just how green innovative ideas and tech that already exist today can be leveraged to create a self-sustaining life.  

How about the US?  Can we having just such a city of our own?  Right now, given the political animosity taking place in our government, I don't expect federal or even state help can be expected to help launch such an endeavor.  However, I would like to see someone come along and do just this.

Perhaps someone like Google that has demonstrated keen interests in green technology can build a G-town that can serve as a model for other towns and cities across America to strive towards.  

It's clear now that only private efforts can make this happen.  And it doesn't have to go Google along.  Earlier this year, Apple, eBay, HP, Intel, Oracle, and Intuit joined together to build a new state-of-the-art hospital in Stanford, California.  It is a $2 billion joint effort between these tech giants that will be provide for a 600-bed facility.

If you're been in or near a major health complex, you know that it and in of itself is a small city.  If you've been on a college or university campus like UCLA or Stanford, you know what I'm talking about.  But build a small town like what Panasonic is attempting to accomplish is probably easier than building a new hospital.  

Supposed these tech companies partner with homebuilders to spread the cost around, I think we can begin to create a neighborhoods where environmentally conscious families can live off renewable power, conservative technologies, and other innovative ideas.

More at Physorg.

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