Solar Roofs Can Easily Solve Coming Energy Crunch And Land Use

It is an irony green tech and conservation of nature sometimes go against one another.  When I read this Cleantechnica post that the US would increase solar capacity installed of the US to 733 MW, doubling all of those installed in 2010, I was perplexed.  That was all less than 370 MW installed.  

Honestly, this cannot be true but at the same time, given the vast power of old oil and the unwillingness of the US government to jump with both political parties' support, well, one should not be completely surprised.  And on top of that, certain elements of the conservation movement want to preserve land use as well as have us cut back on petro-based energy economy.  

I think distributed roof top energy plans should be a more viable solution.  After all, homes and commercial buildings have largely been pre-approved for such use.  On top of that, we end up not having to rely upon the centralized power plants.  For computer folks, it's SETI program that studies signals from the stars.  Instead of one central supercomputer doing all the analysis, millions of private home PCs are used to help with the effort.  

Recently efforts by large corporations are real world results.  And the $1.4 billion in loans from the DOE?  Imagine if that was increased by ten times.  Fifty times.  Supposed we put $50 billion a year for the next ten years into building out our green effort, where we get our power from will be incredibly different from where we get it today.

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