Should Windows Phone Go Open Source? To Buy Time But Still Need Something More To Turn Things Around - It's Own iPod Moment

Source:  Wired.

Here is an interesting Wired post about what Microsoft should do about its mobile situation, which is bad, and maybe to turn things around, it should open up Windows.

The post has a thing or two to say about past attempts at open source.  It's likely, in my opinion, Steve Balmer, current and outgoing CEO, didn't go for it.  Just like he didn't go for projects that could have put Microsoft ahead and put the iconic software company in a stronger position.

It's why the post believes a new CEO could utlimately do what Balmer was too afraid to do.  It's unlikely.  I'm tell you that now.  But even if somehow, the new CEO was brave enough to try, it would only be the first step.  It may slow the bleeding but won't stop it.

Microsoft will still need something new that convinces hardware makers, software developers, and, more importantly, businesses and consumers that it has something new and innovative.  The new CEO will need its iPod moment.  It's the only way to turn Microsoft around in the eyes of the media and public.

It can't not compete with Android and iOS head-on.  It's losing big time and will continue to. And the wearable computing device revolution on the horizon is a good place to start.

When Steve Jobs came back to Apple, it didn't try to hit back at the PC market.  Apple first stopped the bleed and found that it could be a big player in the rising MP3 player market.  And it used that to launch an innovative device to get the company back into the public's mind set.

Sure, Microsoft would have to continue to release new phones and Surface tablets. New Xbox devices will need to be released and updated.  But it's this new product or service that is needed to get Microsoft back on the path.

Why is this important to Apple and Google fans?  Well, word is that Blackberry is looking to sell itself off and may be looking to lay off 40% of its workforce, we can no longer count on the former smartphone champ to put up a fight in the mobile market anymore.  Only Microsoft remains with the muscles and, yes, smarts, to do it.

We want more competition.  Not less.

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