Social: Emergingadolescence, I May Be Suffering From It As Well


Emergingadolescence is a term I suspect will become more prevalent in society in the years if not decades to come.  It's a condition, maybe, in which people in their twenties or thirties are delaying adulthood as much as possible, for the most part, avoiding responsibilities that comes with their age, profession, or social activities.

I'll admit this.  I feel at times that I have not grown up to the extent that I should as well.  Maybe it comes from my environment where many of my friends are still single and we are uncertain about what we want from having a family.

Many more people are in fact staying single.  However, the extremes suffered by the people mentioned in the post from Slate about millennials are exactly issues that I've begun to see back in the early 2000s.  

There is an attempt by some to say to these kids (I say kids because of this perception) to just "suck it up".  However, I do believe this is a real change in society that adds pressure that previous generations have not had to deal with.

College degrees, particularly a mere bachelor, is like a glorified high school education.  Only a decade ago, this was enough to ensure financial and professional stability.  What'll be enough?  A master?  Hardly.  And only the right PhD will matter.

I'm sure many of us have parents who have college degrees that almost guaranteed them the ability to raise and provide for their families.  Today, dual incomes is barely enough.

All this has increased in the number of mental health cases - many are attributed to narcissistic personality disorder. Fairly or not, that is the case.

One would think that in the age of social networks should help with the process and bring like-minded millennials together - sort of a support group.  Even as they post and expose their privacy to advertisers, they are still unable to shed some of these darker feelings and fears for all to read.

The Slate post is a worthy read.  It summarizes the basics of the state of social norms and what pressures faced these "adult children".  It doesn't offer a solution as it should not.  

In a note related to this, I think some parents suffer from the opposite, unwillingness to accept the fact that their children have grown up enough to leave the nest. I don't know which is worse.

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