Chromebook - The Ultimate Mobile Development Device (Maybe)

I'm a newbie when it comes to development and I need a starting point.  Recently, I inherited a Chromebook that I bought my nephew when his broke (sort of - it was resurrected by Best Buy).  After getting it to work again, I got it back.  As a Mac and Windows user, what would I have a Chromebook for?  Having no need for more than one machine, it sat there for a couple of weeks.  So I'm thinking while I have a need to improve my skills for the workplace of tomorrow, maybe I can use the Chromebook for building and improving on those skills.

So, I'm going to start as a newbie - I'll need a starting point, I'll need to make mistakes and learn from them, and I will gauge how the $300 Chromebook compares to my older an more expensive MacBook (from 2016) and a Windows tablet (I got it as a work laptop but it is too slow for massive Excel and database use) that I have turned it into a machine to learning cyber security.


My starting point is Python.  Now, I've thought about Javascript.  I might still do that months down the line as I feel more comfortable working with SQL, Python, and Swift on the Mac.  All these I believe are important skills that I will need if I find myself in a position to reevaluate my future or use them to improve the work that I am doing now.

So, day one.  I'm reading these posts on developing on a CB and Python.  
  • Techrepublic - Developers can now code on Chromebooks thanks to Linux support on ChromeOS
  • Alex P Miller - Data Science on a Chromebook: How to run Jupyter, Python, & R locally in ChromeOS
  • TechnoKids - How do I Use Python on Chromebooks? Trinket and TechnoTurtle
  • Young Wonks - CODING ON A CHROMEBOOK USING PYTHON AND PYGAME
  • Medium - Setup a Chromebook for web development
  • Martech With Me - 7 Ways you can code in Python with your Chromebook for free
I'm going to test out what I eventually learn on the Mac and iPad as well.  I believe the tablet to be the ultimate development machine once the development tools from Apple, Google, and others are more mature.

My goal to get practical - turn what I learn as quickly as possible onto real world use.  I believe the issue with a lot of people who get started into coding or being to think about it and quickly give up is because they don't see the practical application almost immediately.  

I would appreciate pointers from other newbies as well as people who can put me and others in the right direction.

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